Spring Exhibitions

16.03.2024 – 10.06.2024

Niv Gafni

Adam’s sons

In an atmosphere of anticipation for events that refuse to take place, large-scale straw scarecrows are sprawled in the gallery space. The manmade figures created in our image act as humanity’s agents in transitioning from a society of hunters-gatherers, dependent on their surroundings, to an agricultural existence that manipulates nature for human needs.  The scarecrow symbolizes the human tension and struggle to control nature, an archaic agricultural tool used against animals damaging crops.

The scarecrows demonstrate the way humans harness the sensation of threat when facing the “uncanny” creature in an agricultural field. Straw figures are also used in various spiritual practices in rituals, as a messenger between the physical world and the metaphysical world, standing as the petitioner’s representative. They are the archetype of the Golem, an empty body intended to serve its creator, but which also embodies the potential for rebellion and fear of retribution. However, these scarecrows, with their repetitive, calm, mechanical movements, have somewhat of a mood of contemplation rather than one of horror, evoking no sensation of vicious evil. Gafni forms natural and mechanical materials into shapes intended as vessels for spirit. The three enlarged figures seem to have been kidnapped from their natural environment of green fields under open skies and brought into the gallery. The agricultural function for which they were created is nullified, and they are now in service to the artist.

 Gafni places these transgressive bodies in a liminal universe; they do not conform to any category, whether living creature, plant, or inanimate object. The operating system moving the figures evokes a sense of vitality, opening a possible path to decay and perhaps even to death.

Gafni’s oeuvre deals with the way all matter changes shape and function in endless processes of construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. We are all made of the same “stardust” in constant transition. The creation of these “straw men” remove them from the natural cycle of the vegetative fauna (sprouting, growing, ripening, withering, which in term nourishes the environment) pointing to human involvement as the expropriation of nature for its own needs.

Gafni shifts the viewpoint from the human perspective to its creations: thus, in this case, scarecrows made of straw and hay, stuffed into people’s clothing, can legitimately demand maximization of their potential for life. They may aspire to break free from human/artist subjugation in favor of returning to a natural cycle of matter and realizing their potential for vitality.

In this exhibition, Gafni deepens his engagement in the elusiveness of phenomena resonating beyond their physical manifestations, crossing into new spaces and destabilizing the tense relationship between humanity and the environment.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus
 

Ronny David

Resonant Landscapes

We are used to taking photographs: the medium that “captures the moment”
has become an inseparable part of all of us. However, when I take a careful
look at Ronny David’s photographs, I am invited to take a wondering look
beyond the immediate moment and begin an internal thought process. Ronny David’s photographer unique pictures, each capturing something of thephotographer’s inner worlds.

These are one-time pictures, as the viewer’s own fields of reference are not the same as Ronny’s. Can one person’s
internal language connect to another’s?
The locations are identifiable, all from “here,””this place” – Israel . They are
from “here.” “this place” Israel – but humans are missing from the landscape.
Ronny photographed only the marks made by people, such as an ancient
structure, a house, an abandoned hotel, tires, chimney, or road shoulders.
The photographs strip these marks from the aura of ancient timesand
transform what is observedinto a kind of event: a wind swept by a certain
location before the photograph was taken; trucks left their tracks on the
ground, the road intended for cars; palm trees damaged by palm weevils, and more.

“I take photographs of things that fit my internal language, what catches my
eye. During the printing process, I talk to myself about what motivates me to
do certain things.” The photograph begins in a selected cell area and
continues in his darkroom. Ronny decides on the size, how far to stretch the color from the photograph, and prints it. “My inner language is not reality but neither is it hyper-realtiy. What interests me is the transition between reality to non-reality. Everything I photograph points right back to me. This resonance is recorded in the language of photography, which is for me a type of poetry.”

Ronny sets out into nature on a regular basis to photograph, seeking what
justifies taking a photo, thinking about what makes something worth shooting.
What changes in the person who makes it “worthwhile to photograph” or not.

“The thing I photograph most is the whole that is me.” Through photography, Ronny seeks the discourse on photography, philosophy, and life. He usually adds a sentence or thought on his facebook page about the thought that motivated him or aroused some sort of experience. His statements are also included in the exhibition.

Ronny’s photography encourage thought on a variety of subjects: vegetation, locale, history, ageing, metamorphoses, light and shadow, nuclearity and its meaning, and more. His mind map denotes associations and crosses borders.
Huge tires seem like a lizard, the abandoned hotel in the Arava signifies other dark realms, the movement of ants over desert earth seem like something else, the abandoned buildings are reminiscent of an ancient past, like a strong, persistent mark on the landscape. If so, what is landscape?

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus
 

Asher Elharar

The hunter’s hut in the Anthropocene

Asher Elharar gathers what others have discarded to use for his works. He bends the material to his needs until it “remembers” its primary characteristics and allows processing, enabling the artist to create renewed beauty, as if working with fresh raw materials. The work with “trash” is part of Elharar’s worldview, formulated over the past years, referring to the horrifying waste, overconsumption, and realization that “one man’s garbage is another’s treasure.”

Elharar has been implementing his longing for freedom and nature in his way of life since his teenage years, expressing his philosophy through his artworks.          Manège refers to horse training, the title of the piece made of horse bones processed and tied into the shape of a horse riding area. In another work, a cymbal attached to a fish criticizes over-fishing of waters, or a handgun which is half rhinoceros head and half weapon refers to hunting endangered species. Elharar’s major theme is the imbalance between humans and nature. His careful technique and finish are the outcome of many years of work as a model-maker for a jewelry company, through which he became extremely familiar with materials, technical solutions, and perfecting work processes.

The Anthropocene refers to the era in which human beings have impacted nature and the ecosystem as distinct from previous geological eras. The Anthropocene denotes a deep crisis: life in the world at present is a kind of experiment on the planet and its inhabitants. Can the Earth’s population – all living things, people, animals, plants – survive in the current hostile environment? Its philosophy strives to point out the fundamental shift in the consensus on the relationship between humanity and nature. We can no longer describe history as an ideological or social struggle: the Earth has become a major, historical factor – one may say a fateful factor – and human beings have become a force of nature.

It seems that presenting animals in this context through the image of “A hunter’s hut in the Anthropocene” (after all, how many such huts have we actually seen?) is a move marking the spirit of the times capturing the horrifying contrast between the order of nature and between human actions that disrupt the ecological equilibrium in shocking extreme deeds that are destroying the world in which we live. 

How long will it take us to awaken, and how will we?


Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Shirel Safra

Quiet wind on the Mountaintop

A space of healing and of prayer welcomes visitors to Shirel Safra’s exhibition, acting as a poetic ecosystem connecting materials from nature towards the heavens and
personal prayer.

As an artist who has left the religious world in which he was raised, Safra is seeking his own authentic pathway to express his individual poetics, one that is not dictated and set out exactly as transmitted from generation to generation. Setting out into nature surrounding his home in the Galilee led Shirel to reconnect back to the place
of direct prayer. Shirel gathers thin, delicate branches and carves them. They act as a “splintered reed” but their fragility speaks of the tree on which they grew, as a reminder of the place from where they were taken. The carvings he incises in the wood look like a secret code similar to prehistoric markings of passing time and the
cycles of nature. The branches/sticks stand in a circle at the center of the space as if placed there by a modern Honi the Circle-Maker to mark a boundary which signified a demand for action from a Higher Power.

The repetitive, meditative act of embroidering is performed along with his tasks of everyday life, transforming his art-making into a routine which acts as his spiritual sustenance on his pathway. The intuitive embroidery enfolds colorfulness and texture, rhythm and movement through space. The size of the embroidery pieces is
reminiscent of Yarmulke, (kippot) or small mandalas, without directionality or defined figurative image. Their constant circling brings to mind the Tibetan prayer wheels, which when rotated, releases the embodied prayer into the universe. The embroideries require a double look from viewers: to closely focus on the revolving object and gaze at its curving lines, while also viewing it as a constellation moving us
around through the exhibition space.

Prayers composed by Shirel which he chanted and recorded, accompany the space which seems to pulse with its own beat: a prayer for deep earth; a prayer for waters of earth and heavens; a prayer for fire with flames of light; and a prayer for the spirit of the times. Shirel thus takes on the role of the artist-shaman who must invent a healing for the wounded people and society addressing individual and collective trauma.

Around the focal point are four stone sculptures devoted to the four basic elements: air, water, fire, and earth. They act as mediators between the natural environs fro where they were taken to the gallery located at the heart of this modern city. These objects are intended to ground and anchor visitors to the basic elements operating in our world, and restore the equilibrium and sense of control which have become
imbalanced since October 7, 2023 and lost their stability and sensibility.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Roni Landa

Nectar

Entering Roni Landa’s exhibition, we are swept away into a different time and place. The dense ornamentation and overflowing colorfulness evoke a distant ambience foreign to the local blinding light and the Israeli “want of matter.”

The broad wall covering and vases force visitors to move between coming closer and moving further away, and the movement allows the latent details concealed by the artist to reveal themselves. 

Landa created wallpaper in the style of William Morris, the Victorian artist and designer from mid-19th century England. Following the great Industrial Revolution, homes were illuminated and it was possible to decorate the rooms. These were the years of “covering the walls,” as the British nicknamed them. Morris was one of the founders of the Arts and Crafts movement and among the founders of one of the largest corporations making wall covers. Many of the motifs involved vegetation for which a bold green color was used. Later it turned out that the green was arsenic-based – a toxic material that led to many cases of death. Decorative beauty became the potential for death.

Landa’s exhibition room I transformed into a seemingly decorative site in the Victorian style mixing decoration with an attraction to death. Landa inserted insects on the green leaves that attract nectar-seeking insects which become its “satisfied customers” or perhaps its potential victims. The entire flower arrangement in the vase, with its veins, capillaries, and flesh color marks out a different territory: male, female, seductive but a bit creepy, with its associations directed to objects associated with death.

Landa drew her inspiration for the “flowers” from Dutch flower painting and early medical models. The overall result is metaphorical life in small vases. The seductive nectar traps seem innocent, but this assumption collapses immediately with the realization that what the viewer sees signifies something else.

Is this only a material appearance? Not necessarily, since the “flowers” are metaphorical and are associated with the symbolism of the still life, signifying the material body in a new way. For many years, plants were considered as living things less developed than humans, but in recent years, research has shown surprising findings on plant intelligence which also illuminates human life (for example, research by Peter Wohlleben). Plant networks create networks to achieve their goals. Plant reproduction teaches something about the ability to survive independently as well as the need for fertilization from other plants.

Taken all together, the works in the exhibition enable associations between flowers and people, between the seductive and disgusting, and between male and female, generating a vague ambivalence. Landa’s artworks move viewers around from the beautiful to the repulsive, from signifier to signified. She integrates various mediums and practices: ceramics, polymers, and cold porcelain, metalsmithing, and even gel nail polish. We are privileged to experience something of the non-hierarchical mixture between external and internal, attraction, repulsion, beauty, pain, and pleasure.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

דן בירנבוים

רישום

על גבי קיר במבואת הגלריה, מציג האמן והאדריכל דן בירנבוים רישומים נבחרים מתוך עבודות אחרונות. עבודתו הרישומית עסקה בעיקר בתיאור נוף, ישראלי. נופים אשר התעלמו בדרך כלל  מנוכחות אנושית. הפעם, נדמה שהאמן מביט אל תוכו. מתוך התנועה המיומנת של מכחול יבש  וצבע שחור על נייר, הוא מצליח להעביר אותנו דרך ציור עין, גם אל מה שהעין רואה (העין כמייצגת את המבט, שולחת בעקיפין גם אל דיון פילוסופי עמוק על המבט) [1]. אנחנו חשים את התנועה המתעקלת של היד ורואים את גלגל העין, אישון, דמות שנקלטה במבט. האדמה עליה ניצבים שלושה ברושים (מוטיב ביצירתו וסמל ישראלי) התעגלה באופן בוטח, עד שנדמה שכך יש לציירה. דמות נקלטת בעין, משוכפלת לדמויות רבות ואנחנו מתבוננים ברישום קהל רב של יחידים הנדמים כגופים אורגנים על צלחת פטרי במעבדה. הרישום נכנע לתנועה עגולה, טבעית, כמעט שלמה, שהופכת לבסיס, למקום ממנו נצרבים הדימויים,העין.  רישומיו של דן מאופיינים בתחושה דואלית אצל הצופה . תנועת המכחול לצד הקפאת הרגע ונדמה שאנחנו נמצאים על סיפו של דבר מה שיש לבחון אותו שוב. רגע חשוב. הבחירה בטכניקה שהיא כמעט וקליגרפית, יוצרת רגע ציורי, יחידי, מרתק.  אלו מתעגלים יחדיו לכדי סממנים חדשים ונוספים ביצירה עשירה, רבת שנים ומרתקת של אמן ישראלי שמצליח לזקק עבודתו כקליגרף יפני, ועם זאת לייצר תחושה מקומית השייכת לכאן ועכשיו.  
[1]  “הנראה והבלתי נראה” (1964) -מוריס מרלו-פונטי העמיד את הגוף במרכז החוויה התפיסתית של היותנו בעולם. לדעתו, ראייה היא חוויה גופנית, בדרך של דואליות והיפוך: גופי הרואה הוא גם הגוף הנראה על ידי האחר. חוויית היסוד של היותי בעולם היא זו של סובייקט צופה שהוא גם נצפה. גם לאקאן ( 1964, סמינר 11) התייחס להתבוננות: המביט הוא חלק מתמונה רחבה יותר, המבליעה בה את המביט בהיותה כוללת את הצופה שהוא תמיד גם נצפה, ותמיד נמצא גם בשדה המבט של האחר.

ללא כותרת 2019 | אקריליק על נייר 42/30 ס"מ
ללא כותרת 2019 | אקריליק על נייר 42/30 ס"מ
ללא כותרת 2019 | אקריליק על נייר 42/30 ס"מ
ללא כותרת 2019 | אקריליק על נייר 42/30 ס"מ
Play Video

Spring Exhibitions 
16.03.2024 – 10.06.2024

Catalogue
Video

Niv Gafni

Adam’s sons

In an atmosphere of anticipation for events that refuse to take place, large-scale straw scarecrows are sprawled in the gallery space. The manmade figures created in our image act as humanity’s agents in transitioning from a society of hunters-gatherers, dependent on their surroundings, to an agricultural existence that manipulates nature for human needs.  The scarecrow symbolizes the human tension and struggle to control nature, an archaic agricultural tool used against animals damaging crops. 

The scarecrows demonstrate the way humans harness the sensation of threat when facing the “uncanny” creature in an agricultural field. Straw figures are also used in various spiritual practices in rituals, as a messenger between the physical world and the metaphysical world, standing as the petitioner’s representative. They are the archetype of the Golem, an empty body intended to serve its creator, but which also embodies the potential for rebellion and fear of retribution. However, these scarecrows, with their repetitive, calm, mechanical movements, have somewhat of a mood of contemplation rather than one of horror, evoking no sensation of vicious evil. 

Gafni forms natural and mechanical materials into shapes intended as vessels for spirit. The three enlarged figures seem to have been kidnapped from their natural environment of green fields under open skies and brought into the gallery. The agricultural function for which they were created is nullified, and they are now in service to the artist.  Gafni places these transgressive bodies in a liminal universe; they do not conform to any category, whether living creature, plant, or inanimate object. The operating system moving the figures evokes a sense of vitality, opening a possible path to decay and perhaps even to death.

Gafni’s oeuvre deals with the way all matter changes shape and function in endless processes of construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. We are all made of the same “stardust” in constant transition. The creation of these “straw men” remove them from the natural cycle of the vegetative fauna (sprouting, growing, ripening, withering, which in term nourishes the environment) pointing to human involvement as the expropriation of nature for its own needs.

Gafni shifts the viewpoint from the human perspective to its creations: thus, in this case, scarecrows made of straw and hay, stuffed into people’s clothing, can legitimately demand maximization of their potential for life. They may aspire to break free from human/artist subjugation in favor of returning to a natural cycle of matter and realizing their potential for vitality.

In this exhibition, Gafni deepens his engagement in the elusiveness of phenomena resonating beyond their physical manifestations, crossing into new spaces and destabilizing the tense relationship between humanity and the environment.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Ronny David

Resonant landscapes

We are used to taking photographs: the medium that “captures the moment” has become an inseparable part of all of us. However, when I take a careful look at Ronny David’s photographs, I am invited to take a wondering look beyond the immediate moment and begin an internal thought process. Ronny David’s photographsare unique pictures, each capturing something of the photographer’s inner worlds. These are one-time pictures, as the viewer;s own fields of reference are not the same as Ronny’s. Can one person’s
internal language connect to another’s?

The locations are identifiable, all from “here,””this place” – Israel . They are from “here.” “this place” Israel – but humans are missing from the landscape.
Ronny photographed only the marks made by people, such as an ancient
structure, a house, an abandoned hotel, tires, chimney, or road shoulders.
The photographs strip these marks from the aura of ancient timesand transform what is observedinto a kind of event: a wind swept by a certain location before the photograph was taken; trucks left their tracks on the ground, the road intended for cars; palm trees damaged by palm weevils, and more.
“I take photographs of things that fit my internal language, what catches my eye. During the printing process, I talk to myself about what motivates me to do certain things.” The photograph begins in a selected cell area and continues in his darkroom. Ronny decides on the size, how far to stretch the color from the photograph, and prints it. “My inner language is not reality but neither is it hyper realtiy. What interests me is the transition between reality to non-reality. Everything I photograph points right back to me. This resonance is recorded in the language of photography, which is for me a type of poetry.”

Ronny sets out into nature on a regular basis to photograph, seeking what justifies taking a photo, thinking about what makes something worth shooting.
What changes in the person who makes it “worthwhile to photograph” or not.
“The thing I photograph most is the whole that is me.” Through photography, Ronny seeks the discourse on photography, philosophy, and life. He usually
adds a sentence or thought on his facebook page about the thought that motivated him or aroused some sort of experience. His statements are also included in the exhibition.
Ronny’s photography encourage thought on a variety of subjects: vegetation, locale, history, ageing, metamorphoses, light and shadow, nuclearity and its meaning, and more. His mind map denotes associations and crosses borders.
Huge tires seem like a lizard, the abandoned hotel in the Arava signifies other dark realms, the movement of ants over desert earth seem like something else, the abandoned buildings are reminiscent of an ancient past, like a strong, persistent mark on the landscape. If so, what is landscape?

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Asher Elharar

The hunter’s hut in the Anthropocene

Asher Elharar gathers what others have discarded to use for his works. He bends the material to his needs until it “remembers” its primary characteristics and allows processing, enabling the artist to create renewed beauty, as if working with fresh raw materials. The work with “trash” is part of Elharar’s worldview, formulated over the past years, referring to the horrifying waste, overconsumption, and realization that “one man’s garbage is another’s treasure.”

Elharar has been implementing his longing for freedom and nature in his way of life since his teenage years, expressing his philosophy through his artworks.          Manège refers to horse training, the title of the piece made of horse bones processed and tied into the shape of a horse riding area. In another work, a cymbal attached to a fish criticizes over-fishing of waters, or a handgun which is half rhinoceros head and half weapon refers to hunting endangered species. Elharar’s major theme is the imbalance between humans and nature. His careful technique and finish are the outcome of many years of work as a model-maker for a jewelry company, through which he became extremely familiar with materials, technical solutions, and perfecting work processes.

The Anthropocene refers to the era in which human beings have impacted nature and the ecosystem as distinct from previous geological eras. The Anthropocene denotes a deep crisis: life in the world at present is a kind of experiment on the planet and its inhabitants. Can the Earth’s population – all living things, people, animals, plants – survive in the current hostile environment? Its philosophy strives to point out the fundamental shift in the consensus on the relationship between humanity and nature. We can no longer describe history as an ideological or social struggle: the Earth has become a major, historical factor – one may say a fateful factor – and human beings have become a force of nature.

It seems that presenting animals in this context through the image of “A hunter’s hut in the Anthropocene” (after all, how many such huts have we actually seen?) is a move marking the spirit of the times capturing the horrifying contrast between the order of nature and between human actions that disrupt the ecological equilibrium in shocking extreme deeds that are destroying the world in which we live. 

How long will it take us to awaken, and how will we?

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Shirel Safra

Quiet wind on the Mountaintop

A space of healing and of prayer welcomes visitors to Shirel Safra’s exhibition, acting as a poetic ecosystem connecting materials from nature towards the heavens and personal prayer.

As an artist who has left the religious world in which he was raised, Safra is seeking his own authentic pathway to express his individual poetics, one that is not dictated and set out exactly as transmitted from generation to generation. Setting out into nature surrounding his home in the Galilee led Shirel to reconnect back to the place of direct prayer. Shirel gathers thin, delicate branches and carves them. They act as a “splintered reed” but their fragility speaks of the tree on which they grew, as a reminder of the place from where they were taken. The carvings he incises in the wood look like a secret code similar to prehistoric markings of passing time and the cycles of nature. The branches/sticks stand in a circle at the center of the space as if placed there by a modern Honi the Circle-Maker to mark a boundary which signified a demand for action from a Higher Power.

 

The repetitive, meditative act of embroidering is performed along with his tasks of everyday life, transforming his art-making into a routine which acts as his spiritual sustenance on his pathway. The intuitive embroidery enfolds colorfulness and texture, rhythm and movement through space. The size of the embroidery pieces is reminiscent of Yarmulke, (kippot) or small mandalas, without directionality or defined figurative image. Their constant circling brings to mind the Tibetan prayer wheels, which when rotated, releases the embodied prayer into the universe. The embroideries require a double look from viewers: to closely focus on the revolving object and gaze at its curving lines, while also viewing it as a constellation moving us around through the exhibition space.

Prayers composed by Shirel which he chanted and recorded, accompany the space which seems to pulse with its own beat: a prayer for deep earth; a prayer for waters of earth and heavens; a prayer for fire with flames of light; and a prayer for the spirit of the times. Shirel thus takes on the role of the artist-shaman who must invent a healing for the wounded people and society addressing individual and collective trauma. 

Around the focal point are four stone sculptures devoted to the four basic elements: air, water, fire, and earth. They act as mediators between the natural environs from where they were taken to the gallery located at the heart of this modern city. These objects are intended to ground and anchor visitors to the basic elements operating in our world, and restore the equilibrium and sense of control which have become imbalanced since October 7, 2023 and lost their stability and sensibility.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Roni Landa

Nectar

Entering Roni Landa’s exhibition, we are swept away into a different time and place. The dense ornamentation and overflowing colorfulness evoke a distant ambience foreign to the local blinding light and the Israeli “want of matter.” The broad wall covering and vases force visitors to move between coming closer and moving further away, and the movement allows the latent details concealed by the artist to reveal themselves. 

Landa created wallpaper in the style of William Morris, the Victorian artist and designer from mid-19th century England. Following the great Industrial Revolution, homes were illuminated and it was possible to decorate the rooms. These were the years of “covering the walls,” as the British nicknamed them. Morris was one of the founders of the Arts and Crafts movement and among the founders of one of the largest corporations making wall covers. Many of the motifs involved vegetation for which a bold green color was used. Later it turned out that the green was arsenic-based – a toxic material that led to many cases of death. Decorative beauty became the potential for death.

Landa’s exhibition room I transformed into a seemingly decorative site in the Victorian style mixing decoration with an attraction to death. Landa inserted insects on the green leaves that attract nectar-seeking insects which become its “satisfied customers” or perhaps its potential victims. The entire flower arrangement in the vase, with its veins, capillaries, and flesh color marks out a different territory: male, female, seductive but a bit creepy, with its associations directed to objects associated with death.

Landa drew her inspiration for the “flowers” from Dutch flower painting and early medical models. The overall result is metaphorical life in small vases. The seductive nectar traps seem innocent, but this assumption collapses immediately with the realization that what the viewer sees signifies something else. Is this only a material appearance? Not necessarily, since the “flowers” are metaphorical and are associated with the symbolism of the still life, signifying the material body in a new way. For many years, plants were considered as living things less developed than humans, but in recent years, research has shown surprising findings on plant intelligence which also illuminates human life (for example, research by Peter Wohlleben). Plant networks create networks to achieve their goals. Plant reproduction teaches something about the ability to survive independently as well as the need for fertilization from other plants.

Taken all together, the works in the exhibition enable associations between flowers and people, between the seductive and disgusting, and between male and female, generating a vague ambivalence. Landa’s artworks move viewers around from the beautiful to the repulsive, from signifier to signified. She integrates various mediums and practices: ceramics, polymers, and cold porcelain, metalsmithing, and even gel nail polish. We are privileged to experience something of the non-hierarchical mixture between external and internal, attraction, repulsion, beauty, pain, and pleasure.

Efi Gen, Keren Weisshaus

Play Video

Accessibility Toolbar